Thursday, October 24, 2019

Hines a Real Difference at Squantum Point Park

This week, Hines partnered with Save the Habor/ Save the Bay and the Department of Conservation and Recreation to remove more than 1.5 tons of trash from Squantum Point Park. In two hours' time, the dedicated volunteers from Hines turned an overgrown, littered, and Sumac infested stretch of land into a manicured green space. Hines has been committed to sustainability since its founding in 1957, and it was clear that the employees present at the cleanup are dedicated to maintaining that mission.

Michael Francis, left, on the day of the clean up with colleagues Kelly Shom and Bob Gendron in front of Marina Bay.

Michael Francis, Managing Director, expressed that "the Hines group, from the very top, makes sure we are giving back to our community", and the 20 plus volunteers did just that. Hines owns and developed the Meriel Marina Bay housing complex, located on the waterfront of Squantum Point Park. As stated by Managing Director, Sean Sacks, Squatum Point Park is a "hidden gem in the Department of Conservation and Recreation network, and we are excited to be out here cleaning up for both the residents of Marina Bay and Massachusetts citizens at large". That hidden gem certainly got polished this week!
Hard at work cutting down Sumac and Bittersweet. 

Although over 1.5 tons of Sumac and Bittersweet were removed from the area, there was nothing bittersweet about clearing extra green space for the community and conserving the stunning park.  Squantum is a former Naval airfield that now offers views of local birds and the Boston skyline.  Hines' dedication to engaging their employees in sustainable practices has left Squantum Point Park cleaner for the community to enjoy.

Employees from Hines, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, and DCR before starting the cleanup.

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is proud to be partners with the Department of Conservation and Recreation and Hines. "With incredible partners like these, creating opportunities for Massachusetts residents to enjoy the beaches, parks, and harbor is as fun as it is impactful," said Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay Executive Director, Chris Mancini. We at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay want to give a big thank you on behalf of us and the community members who will be enjoying Squatum Point Park to the Hines group and the Department of Conservation and Recreation for their incredible effort!

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Wrapping up Share the Harbor Cruise Season with Two Harbor Tours


Passengers on the top deck out near Deer Island
Sunday's weather proved to be spectacular for our two Share the Harbor cruises aboard the Mass Bay Lines' Freedom. More than three hundred passengers arrived at Rowes Wharf to spend a few hours cruising around the Boston Harbor eager to learn more about certain landmarks in each waterfront neighborhood. Aboard was our trusty narrator David Coffin, who was the guide to learning more about the urban natural resource that is the Boston Harbor.



Collecting a Treasure Hunt before boarding


Equipped with treasure hunts, visitors on both cruises were welcomed aboard by Mass Bay Lines crew members and Save the Harbor youth staffers alike. They took their seats across all three levels, and prepared
to set out on a narrated adventure on the water. David kicked off his narration with the Boston Tea Party as we passed the Fort Point Channel, before cruising out past the seaport and Castle Island on our way towards Spectacle Island.




While approaching Spectacle, people learned the way that Boston once removed trash from the city was to ferry it out to Spectacle Island. In order for the island to be transformed into the National and State Park that it is today, the trash was burned in a fire that lasted ten years. For many of the people aboard who had visited Spectacle Island, they were shocked to learn that the island had such a rich history. Past Spectacle, there lies a black and white structure that emerges from a question mark shaped island. Cruisers learned of the scary history from the age of sail when this island was used to scare away those who should not enter the inner harbor.
David pointing out a nearby landmark for guests
With the turnaround slowly occurring out in front of Deer Island, all aboard learned where the sewage from Boston and the surrounding towns is sent to be treated. David even remarked that the water is so clean that people can drink it, which is a testament to the feat of engineering that the sewage treatment plant is.

People in line for cruise two excited to embark on their trip
To wrap up the cruise, we looped around the inner harbor past Logan Airport and the rest of East Boston towards Charlestown where we caught a great glimpse of the Tobin Bridge, Bunker Hill Monument, and of course Old Ironside also known as the USS Constitution. We then headed back to Rowes Wharf to dock and pick up the next group of folks who were lining up for cruise number two.




Overall, we had a spectacular day weather wise, great turnout from the public, and many new facts that we once did not know about the Boston Harbor. Although this concludes our Share the Harbor Cruises for 2019, we are excited to expand upon such a successful program in 2020. Stay Tuned!

A huge thank you to Mass Bay Lines for making these two harbor tours possible.

Save the Harbor's free Share the Harbor Cruises are made possible with Leadership Grants from Cronin Development, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and Bay State Cruise Company.

Save the Harbor is grateful for Leadership Grants from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, The Boston Foundation, The Coca-Cola Foundation, Exelon Generation, and John Hancock Financial Services.

Save the Harbor is also grateful for Partnership Grants from the Boston Bruins Foundation, Boston Properties – Atlantic Wharf, Boston Properties—200 Clarendon, The Daily Catch Seaport, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Eastern Salt Company, Inc., Engie, Fan Pier - The Fallon Company, Highland Street Foundation, Hood Business Park, The HYM Investment Group, LLC, IR+M Charitable Fund, The Llewellyn Foundation, Massachusetts Port Authority, National Grid Foundation, P & G Gillette, Lawrence J. and Anne Rubenstein Charitable Foundation, William E. Schrafft & Bertha E. Schrafft Charitable Trust, Clinton H. & Wilma T. Shattuck Charitable Trust, and Vertex.

Save the Harbor also appreciates Stewardship Grants from the Camp Harbor View Foundation, Circle Furniture, Comcast, Copeland Family Foundation, The Cricket Foundation, Cruise Industry Charitable Foundation, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Elizabeth Elser Doolittle Charitable Trust, Dorr Charitable Foundation, Enbridge, Tom & Lucinda Foley, Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation, The Kershaw Foundation – Cheers for Children, George Lewis - Haven Trust, Liberty Bay Credit Union, Lovett Woodsum Foundation, Maine Community Foundation, MarineMax Russo, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Nicholson Foundation, Pabis Foundation, REI, RMR Real Estate Services, Rockland Trust Pavilion, Skanska, Abbot & Dorothy H. Stevens Foundation, TD Charitable Foundation, and Tishman Speyer.

Save the Harbor would also like to thank our Program Funders Andus Baker & Rowan Murphy Family Fund, MA Attorney General’s Office Healthy Summer and Youths Jobs Program, The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation, Beacon Capital Partners, LLC, Andrew Calamare & Marianne Connolly, Cell Signaling Technology, Diversified Automotive, Legal Sea Foods, Miss Wallace M. Leonard Foundation, Mass Bay Credit Union, Matthew J. & Gilda F. Strazzula Foundation, UDR, and Kyle & Sara Warwick.

Save the Harbor would also like to extend our gratitude to our Supporters 3A Marine Service, The Bay State Federal Savings Charitable Foundation, Cresset Group, Massachusetts Marine Educational Trust, Randy Peeler & Kate Kellogg.

Special thanks as well to the hundreds of individual donors for their support and to our partners at the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Metropolitan Beaches Commission, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and the YMCA of Greater Boston.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

New Staff Member- Maya Smith

Ahoy! 

    My name is Maya Smith and I am the new Outreach and Office Coordinator for Save the Harbor/Save the Bay! I am thrilled to be joining the team and am looking forward to using this blog post as an oppor-tuna-ty to work in some ocean-related puns.

Maya's first Harbor cruise this past Sunday. 

    I am a MA native who grew up in Haverhill and moved to Boston in 2014 to attend Suffolk University. Haverhill is on the North shore of MA so I grew up frequenting the local beaches. You Betta believe I'm familiar with rushing into freezing ocean water as soon as the weather hits 70 degrees!  I love to travel, but my favorite things to do in Boston are grabbing food in Chinatown, visiting art museums, chilling with the seals at the Aquarium, and getting midnight pastries from Bova's.


Maya in Prague, where she studied abroad for a semester in college. 

    I have three brothers, a dog, and a fin-tastic mother who are very surprised to see me joining an environmental organization since science was never my strong suit. I got my BA in 2018 in Sociology and Education Studies, with a concentration in Youth and Community Engagement. I am passionate about youth advancement and maintaining healthy and supportive environments for community growth. There cannot be healthy and growing communities without protecting and maintaining the local ecosystem, like Save the Harbor/Save the Bay has worked to do. Save the Harbor/Save the Bay has dedicated themselves to providing clean water and enriching programming to our community for over 30 years and I'm ecstatic to join the cause! I can't wait to further connect the community to the incredible programming that Save the Harbor/Save the Bay has to offer!


Fin.

-Maya

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Boston Consulting Group Makes an Impact During "Impact Month"

Members of the Boston Consulting Group Boston Office teamed up with Save the Harbor staff, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Fort Point Neighborhood Association, and Friends of Fort Point Channel to clean up Boston's waterfront and surrounding neighborhoods. Across two days, 50 volunteers removed more than three tons of trash, weeds, and branches from Carson Beach and the Fort Point Channel Neighborhood, improving 2 miles of public land in the process. The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) volunteer teams were extremely enthusiastic and hardworking, accomplishing a great deal in a short amount of time.


On Friday October 4th, BCG members met at DCR's Carson Beach to remove invasive plants from along the sea wall and clear the sidewalks of sand and leaves that had already begun to fall. The morning started off with higher temperatures and a bit of sun, which allowed for a great introduction to Save the Harbor's mission on one of our country's cleanest urban beaches. Wielding loppers, rakes, brooms and shovels, the team got to work and moved as a unit along the edge of the beach to beautify the area to tend and remove plants that were not only an eyesore but harmful to the native plants.

The day concluded with an amazing transformation of the beach entrance where volunteers and Save the Harbor staff removed more than a truckload of Sumac. In only a few short hours, the BCG group cleared over one ton of invasive materials and other debris from about 1.5 miles of beach, returned around 1,000 pounds of sand back to the beach from the sidewalks and ADA access ramps.


Friday October 11th brought 25 BCG volunteers to Wormwood Park in the Fort Point Neighborhood. With a nor'easter in the forecast, the hearty staff arrived ready to work. After brief introductions to Save the Harbor and our partners at Friends of Fort Point Channel and the Fort Point Neighborhood Association, they buckled down, in an bold attempt to complete all the work before the deluge began. The weed filled park, as well as the fencing along the parking lot on A Street were no match for the determined team of BCG volunteers who filled 62 bags of trash and debris in just over 90 minutes.


By lunch time, the mulch lining A street was visible, and most dramatically the park seemed to take on new life being cleared from tree and plant debris. Many passerby commented on our progress and thanked us for making their neighborhood a little nicer, which truly brought meaning to the day's endeavors.



A big thanks goes out to Boston Consulting Group for their hard work, determination and dedication to their community, as well as to Save the Harbor's partners at DCR, Friends of Fort Point Channel and Fort Point Neighborhood Association. 

Friday, October 4, 2019

 On October third I had the privilege to attend the Outfall Monitoring Science Advisory Panel alongside Save the Harbor Save the Bay, as a policy intern. The meeting was full of professionals from OMSAP and the MWRA, as well as representatives from several environmental groups in and around Boston. On one hand the meeting was conducted much as you might expect an advisory panel to go with presenters giving a summery of their research and making recommendations, on the other hand the conversions would often veer off into incredibly technical and specific research methods and data points. These sudden dives gave a much greater weight to the discussions and even with all the prep research I did beforehand I still had trouble keeping up.
Among the many topics covered were, legacy contaminants in sediment the surprise red tide bloom, Pre-cancer disease monitoring in flounder, passive sampling, emerging contamination, and the dangers of micro-plastics. I was pleased to see that the overall state of Boston Harbor is good and getting better, in fact the panel was able to halt two expensive tests as they were no longer required.
This year's red tide still doesn't have an answer but several hypothesis were presented and further research into making sure that the bloom doesn't stick around was requested.
Finally the presence of Micro-plastics was brought to the floor, the lack of proper research was a matter of some discussion.
All in all this meeting was an exceptional one especially for an intern such as myself as I want to understand the policy making process, it was also a lesson on just how much preparation is required to fully understand and appreciate the intricacies of the discussion and the ramifications of each decision.

Outflow Monitoring Science Advisory Panel Meeting - Scituate, MA


The Bay from Scituate, MA

Hey Ya'll,

On October 3rd I had the opportunity to attend a meeting of the Outflow Monitoring Science Advisory Panel in my capacity as a Policy Intern here at Save the Harbor alongside Bruce Berman and my fellow intern Patrick.

The meeting was a chance for me to get acquainted with recent and upcoming environmental, scientific, and policy issues and accomplishments surrounding Boston Harbor. I was pleased to have the opportunity to chat at some length with Dean Mark Patterson of Northeastern University about his work out in Nahant; and with Dr. Betsy Reilley of the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA) about the business practices, product choices, and infrastructure that the MWRA has developed while being a key part of the Boston Harbor clean-up. It was quite a productive day in a absolutely beautiful place!

On the beach down the street from the NOAA offices where the meeting was held (photo by Patrick Hackett)

Until next time,
Sebastian

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Wrapping up September with a Spectacle Island Trip

Sunday's weather had passengers feeling like it was summer again as they hopped on board the Bay State Cruise Company's Provincetown II for Save the Harbor/Save the Bay's cruise out to Spectacle Island. With nearly 650 members of the public attending, guests arrived at the dock ready to swim, fish, hunt for beach treasures, and hike around the drumlins in Boston's National and State Park.


Once underway, Harbor Historian David Coffin welcomed everyone to Boston Harbor, and filled the short trip out to Spectacle with the story of the Boston Harbor Cleanup. He pointed out different islands as we were passing, and spoke of the importance of the sewage treatment plant on Deer Island. He painted a picture of the transformation of the body of water that once was referred to as a "Harbor of Shame" to the beautiful blue-green waves that we were cruising through. David makes it a point to go swimming every day that he is out on Spectacle Island, and on this particular day he had some company taking a dip at the swimming beach.

Several members of the summer youth staff returned to share their expertise with the Harbor's marine life and Save the Harbor's Youth Environmental Education Curriculum. They engaged with children and adults alike to for fishing and crabbing on the pier. Hundreds of participants spent time learning how to fish, learning about the dozens of crabs they caught, and hearing more about the mission of Save the Harbor. 


On the beach, people were searching for the Treasures of Spectacle Island including ceramics and sea glass with staff and volunteers. They kicked off their search with an introduction to the treasures that they might find with rangers from the National Park Service, and then spent hours combing the beach in search of these items. 

Up on the drumlins, folks were flying kites and exploring the island with the Boston skyline in the distance. There are several miles of trails to explore, so visitors looking to get in a little exercise while on island got their fix, complete with information boards with more about the history and species found on and around Spectacle Island.


On the boat ride home, there were many smiles, laughs, and chatter about the afternoon on Spectacle. We truly could not have asked for a better day to cruise out to the Boston Harbor Islands. 

To stay up-to-date on the work we do to restore, protect and share Boston Harbor visit www.savetheharbor.org and like or follow savetheharbor on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Save the Harbor's free Share the Harbor Cruises are made possible with Leadership Grants from Cronin Development, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and Bay State Cruise Company.

Save the Harbor is grateful for Leadership Grants from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, The Boston Foundation, The Coca-Cola Foundation, Exelon Generation, and John Hancock Financial Services.

Save the Harbor is also grateful for Partnership Grants from the Boston Bruins Foundation, Boston Properties – Atlantic Wharf, Boston Properties—200 Clarendon, The Daily Catch Seaport, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Eastern Salt Company, Inc., Engie, Fan Pier - The Fallon Company, Highland Street Foundation, Hood Business Park, The HYM Investment Group, LLC, IR+M Charitable Fund, The Llewellyn Foundation, Massachusetts Port Authority, National Grid Foundation, P & G Gillette, Lawrence J. and Anne Rubenstein Charitable Foundation, William E. Schrafft & Bertha E. Schrafft Charitable Trust, Clinton H. & Wilma T. Shattuck Charitable Trust, and Vertex.

Save the Harbor also appreciates Stewardship Grants from the Camp Harbor View Foundation, Circle Furniture, Comcast, Copeland Family Foundation, The Cricket Foundation, Cruise Industry Charitable Foundation, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Elizabeth Elser Doolittle Charitable Trust, Dorr Charitable Foundation, Enbridge, Tom & Lucinda Foley, Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation, The Kershaw Foundation – Cheers for Children, George Lewis - Haven Trust, Liberty Bay Credit Union, Lovett Woodsum Foundation, Maine Community Foundation, MarineMax Russo, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Nicholson Foundation, Pabis Foundation, REI, RMR Real Estate Services, Rockland Trust Pavilion, Skanska, Abbot & Dorothy H. Stevens Foundation, TD Charitable Foundation, and Tishman Speyer.

Save the Harbor would also like to thank our Program Funders Andus Baker & Rowan Murphy Family Fund, MA Attorney General’s Office Healthy Summer and Youths Jobs Program, The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation, Beacon Capital Partners, LLC, Andrew Calamare & Marianne Connolly, Cell Signaling Technology, Diversified Automotive, Legal Sea Foods, Miss Wallace M. Leonard Foundation, Mass Bay Credit Union, Matthew J. & Gilda F. Strazzula Foundation, UDR, and Kyle & Sara Warwick.

Save the Harbor would also like to extend our gratitude to our Supporters 3A Marine Service, The Bay State Federal Savings Charitable Foundation, Cresset Group, Massachusetts Marine Educational Trust, Randy Peeler & Kate Kellogg.

Special thanks as well to the hundreds of individual donors for their support and to our partners at the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Metropolitan Beaches Commission, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and the YMCA of Greater Boston.

To stay up-to-date on the work we do to restore, protect and share Boston Harbor visit www.savetheharbor.org and like or follow savetheharbor on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Monday, September 30, 2019

Boston Consulting Group Spends Service Day 2019 At Tenean Beach With STHSTB


On Thursday September 26th Save the Harbor/Save the Bay’s staff teamed up with Boston Consulting Group (BCG) as part of BCG's Service Day 2019 for a clean-up at the Department of Conservation and Recreation's Tenean Beach and Finnegan Park in Dorchester.


Tenean Beach, in the Port Norfolk neighborhood, is a swimming beach with a playground and tennis courts located at the mouth of the Neponset River where it opens into Dorchester Bay. Finnegan Park, a short walk away, is a relatively new DCR park having been converted from industrial to recreational use in 2017 after undergoing rehabilitation.

On Thursday, a group of roughly 50 employees from BCG helped to make of these properties cleaner and more accessible by removing debris, weeds, and trash over the course of the day. Volunteers working on Tenean Beach scoured the sand, green areas, and parking lot to pick up trash, and another team removed weeds from the seawall, sidewalk and grassy open areas. In the afternoon volunteers swept sand that had blown onto the sidewalks back onto the playground and raked the grassy areas for leaves and debris.


The group at Finnegan Park spent the day removing phragmites, an invasive sea grass, from the shoreline and cutting a strangling vine that was overtaking the local flora and fences. Volunteers also combed the park removing plastic trash and debris from the green spaces.


This day was part of BCG’s Service Day 2019 where they partner with different organizations around Boston for a day of community service. This was the second year in a row that BCG chose to work with Save the Harbor/Save the Bay at Tenean Beach and Finnegan Park. Save the Harbor is proud to work with our partners as we prepare these beaches for the fall and winter season.

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts and Save the Harbor/Save the Bay Team Up for Service Day 2019


With temperatures in the eighties last Friday, it was a perfect day to spend at the beach for Blue Cross Blue Shield’s 9th annual Service Day: One Community. One Blue. On September 20th more than 3,000 employees volunteer at 52 different sites across Massachusetts. More than 40 of those associates chose to join Save the Harbor/Save the Bay at the Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Carson Beach in South Boston to help clean up the beach and the surrounding green space.

The morning started at the McCormack Bath House with an introduction to Save the Harbor’s mission from Vice President Chris Mancini complete with a sea chanty promoting teamwork to set the tone for the day. Representatives from DCR introduced the tasks that needed completing, and after that the groups were on their way.


The next three hours were spent hard at work picking up trash along William J. Day Boulevard, painting shade shelters along the boardwalk, removing sand from the sidewalk behind the sea wall, and landscaping at the nearby South Boston Neighborhood House. During this time, the teams made up of Save the Harbor Staff, Blue Cross Blue Shield employees, and DCR staff took the time to get to know one another. Everyone involved was friendly and talkative, and the tasks at hand allowed each group to unite around a common goal.


After a delicious lunch provided by BCBS, the morning groups joined together for the final push to remove the sand from the sidewalk and return it to the beach. Wielding brooms and shovels, the group quickly moved across the miles of beach until the sidewalk was clear for pedestrians and cyclists alike.

It is truly amazing how much one group of people can get done in a short period of time when they are motivated and unified around a common goal. The teams really dove right in on getting the work done efficiently and thoroughly so that they accomplished an immense amount in a few short hours despite the grueling heat and sun.

Thank you to everyone who took part in this great event on the cleanest urban beach in the country. All of us at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay appreciate having Blue Cross Blue Shield as our partners on their service day, and we thank them for their continued support, hard work and dedication to our mission and our community.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Hundreds enjoy a fall cruise to Boston Light with Save the Harbor/Save the Bay


It was a true sunset cruise Monday night as nearly 700 people joined us on the Bay State Cruise Company’s flagship Provincetown II for our Share the Harbor Boston Light cruise to take in the sights and sounds of Boston Harbor at dusk.
Nearly 700 people were aboard Provincetown II for the September 16 Boston Light Cruise.
It was shaping up to be a picturesque autumn evening, and the forecast did not disappoint as the cruise departed the World Trade Center dock. The sun was setting behind the city as we reached the lighthouse, which provided picture-perfect opportunities for all on board.
Boston Light at sunset during the September 16 Share the Harbor cruise.
As we motored past the harbor islands, commentary was provided by Boston Harbor historian David Coffin, whose entertaining charisma captured the attention of everyone on board. He told tales of the golden age of piracy around Boston Harbor and shared history of the harbor as we passed, including the great environmental success story of the Boston Harbor Cleanup.

We were then treated to his rendition of the hymn Let the Lower Lights Be Burning, about the lights from towns onshore guiding ships into port.


Also, aboard the Provincetown II was special guest Dr. Sally Snowman, the 70th keeper of Boston Light and first female light keeper in its long history. She spoke about her daily life and duties on Little Brewster Island. Guests were captivated by her description of the crashing waves, passing boats, beautiful sunsets, and marine life that she experiences. With her, she brought photos from the island’s past and the evolution of the Boston Light and the keeper’s house since 1716.
Harbor Historian and narrator David Coffin, and current Boston Light keeper Sally Snowman.
As the sun made its final descent, a member of the Coast Guard played the bugle to mark the end of the day, as is customary at sunset in the Coast Guard.

At nightfall, our fun filled cruise came to an end with Boston’s skyline lighting up the water around us. People flooded to the bow to take in the beautiful sights and to capture it on their cameras.
People capture photos of the Boston skyline at sunset.
According to Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay’s Vice President Chris Mancini, these free trips are part of the new Share the Harbor initiative that was launched in the spring.

“So far this year nearly 5,000 people have taken part in this great new program,” said Mancini. “The best way we know to ‘Save the Harbor’ is to ‘Share the Harbor’ with the public through free events and programs on the Harbor, the beach, the waterfront and the islands.”

There are still opportunities to get out on the harbor with us! Click here (http://blog.savetheharbor.org/2019/04/ten-free-share-harbor-cruises-in-2019.html) to sign for our next Share the Harbor cruise on September 29 to Spectacle Island.

To stay up-to-date on the work we do to restore, protect and share Boston Harbor visit www.savetheharbor.org and like or follow savetheharbor on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Save the Harbor's free Share the Harbor Cruises are made possible with Leadership Grants from Cronin Development, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and Bay State Cruise Company.

Save the Harbor is grateful for Leadership Grants from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, The Boston Foundation, The Coca-Cola Foundation, Exelon Generation, and John Hancock Financial Services.

Save the Harbor is also grateful for Partnership Grants from the Boston Bruins Foundation, Boston Properties – Atlantic Wharf, Boston Properties—200 Clarendon, The Daily Catch Seaport, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Eastern Salt Company, Inc., Engie, Fan Pier - The Fallon Company, Highland Street Foundation, Hood Business Park, The HYM Investment Group, LLC, IR+M Charitable Fund, The Llewellyn Foundation, Massachusetts Port Authority, National Grid Foundation, P & G Gillette, Lawrence J. and Anne Rubenstein Charitable Foundation, William E. Schrafft & Bertha E. Schrafft Charitable Trust, Clinton H. & Wilma T. Shattuck Charitable Trust, and Vertex.

Save the Harbor also appreciates Stewardship Grants from the Camp Harbor View Foundation, Circle Furniture, Comcast, Copeland Family Foundation, The Cricket Foundation, Cruise Industry Charitable Foundation, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Elizabeth Elser Doolittle Charitable Trust, Dorr Charitable Foundation, Enbridge, Tom & Lucinda Foley, Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation, The Kershaw Foundation – Cheers for Children, George Lewis - Haven Trust, Liberty Bay Credit Union, Lovett Woodsum Foundation, Maine Community Foundation, MarineMax Russo, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Nicholson Foundation, Pabis Foundation, REI, RMR Real Estate Services, Rockland Trust Pavilion, Skanska, Abbot & Dorothy H. Stevens Foundation, TD Charitable Foundation, and Tishman Speyer.
Save the Harbor would also like to thank our Program Funders Andus Baker & Rowan Murphy Family Fund, MA Attorney General’s Office Healthy Summer and Youths Jobs Program, The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation, Beacon Capital Partners, LLC, Andrew Calamare & Marianne Connolly, Cell Signaling Technology, Diversified Automotive, Legal Sea Foods, Miss Wallace M. Leonard Foundation, Mass Bay Credit Union, Matthew J. & Gilda F. Strazzula Foundation, UDR, and Kyle & Sara Warwick.

Save the Harbor would also like to extend our gratitude to our Supporters 3A Marine Service, The Bay State Federal Savings Charitable Foundation, Cresset Group, Massachusetts Marine Educational Trust, Randy Peeler & Kate Kellogg.

Special thanks as well to the hundreds of individual donors for their support and to our partners at the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Metropolitan Beaches Commission, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and the YMCA of Greater Boston.

To stay up-to-date on the work we do to restore, protect and share Boston Harbor visit www.savetheharbor.org and like or follow savetheharbor on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

New Intern - Sebastian Belfanti

Sebastian Sailing in Boston Harbor

Sebastian Belfanti started last week as one of our newest class of interns here at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay. Originally from Newark, NJ Sebastian attended high school in upstate New York where he was a captain of the school rowing team and worked with researchers at Columbia and Stanford Universities. Sebastian attended college at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA where he received his BS in geology, a minor in history, and used geochemical analysis to identify the source of gold deposits in the Chandalar Mining Region of Northern Alaska. Sebastian just recently completed his MSc studying the granites of Yosemite National Park, CA, at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN. During his studies he completed fieldwork in 11 U.S. States, as well as South Tirol and Elba in Italy, and developed a new methodology for imaging of granitic minerals.




 (Top) Sebastian on the summit of Johnson Peak and (Bottom) Cathedral Peak, a portion of his field site in Yosemite National Park, CA



He is now looking to expand into a career where his work will have a more immediate impact, and he joins us at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay to gain experience working in policy, advocacy, and to gain exposure to non-profit work generally. He looks forward to contributing a strong scientific background, and learning as much as possible over the next few months with us.

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Comcast Foundation Grant To Strengthen Job Readiness Skills For BPS Students Employed At Save The Harbor

The Boston high school students employed by Save the Harbor/Save the Bay next summer will have the opportunity to develop new ways to strengthen their leadership and job readiness skills thanks to a $20,000 grant from the Comcast Foundation.



The 20-25 Boston Public School students, who help lead Save the Harbor’s Youth Environmental Education Programs, develop these skills by participating in a suite of career-focused, technology training projects while employed during the summer months. Next year, with support from the Comcast Foundation grant, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay will incorporate skills training across all areas of their Youth Programs aimed at increasing the teens’ confidence in dealing with the evolving tech industry, and introducing them to potential pathways to careers on Boston Harbor that require increasing levels of technological literacy.

These new technology and leadership training sessions begin during a week-long orientation and are further developed at eight additional sessions throughout the summer. In addition to strengthening the leadership, communications, and technology skills of the teens, these trainings will also empower them with skills necessary to present the organization’s mission and programs to the public, with an objective to develop the youth to be competitive candidates in today’s workforce.

“Save the Harbor is proud to continue and deepen our partnership with Comcast and the Comcast Foundation,” said Chris Mancini, Vice President of Operations & Programs. “Their support over the years has helped provide laptops to our youth, iPads that enhance the efficiency and professionalism of our programs, and Internet Essentials to people from around the region.”

This grant represents great new potential for Save the Harbor’s programs and participants, who will have the opportunity to build and pilot underwater drones at Youth Environmental Education sites like Carson Beach in South Boston, Piers Park in East Boston, and public events from Nahant to Nantasket.

Each year Save the Harbor/Save the Bay sees increased confidence in their youth staff as they learn to communicate and educate others and that newly developed skill sets translate into success in their chosen fields. The leadership, communications, technology, and workforce readiness skills learned in this program play an important role developing the teen’s skills and experiences needed to make them competitive prospects in a changing marketplace.

Join Save the Harbor on Two Free “Share the Harbor” Cruises in September


Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is hosting two free “Share the Harbor” cruises to the Boston Harbor Islands from the Seaport this month, and wants you to know that there is plenty of room for you and your friends and family on the boat!

Harbor is hosting two free “Share the Harbor” Cruises in September.

Join us on Monday, September 16, from 6 to 8 p.m. for a free sunset cruise to Boston Light with wheelhouse narration by our harbor historian David Coffin, who will share songs and stories of the sea. Sally Snowman, the 70th Keeper of Boston Light, will also be on board dressed in period garb, to answer your questions about her life on Little Brewster Island.

The public is also invited to join us on Sunday, September 29, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for a free trip to explore the Treasures of Spectacle Island, which has been transformed from a landfill into the most popular destination in the Boston Harbor Islands National and State Park.

You can spend your time on Spectacle Island exploring Treasure Beach with Save the Harbor’s BayWatcher Bruce Berman, hiking to the top of the North Drumlin for a spectacular view of the city, or fishing from the pier with our Youth Environmental Education program staff.

Both cruises depart from the World Trade Center ferry terminal on Seaport Boulevard in South Boston on Bay State Cruise Company’s flagship Provincetown II, which can easily accommodate 1000 passengers.

Though there is plenty of room for you and your friends and family on the boat, reservations are required. Make your reservation today for one or both of these free Share the Harbor cruises at www.tinyurl.com/SharetheHarbor2019.

According to Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay’s Vice President Chris Mancini, these free trips are part of our new Share the Harbor initiative that they launched in the spring. “So far this year nearly 5,000 people have taken part in this great new program,” said Mancini. “The best way we know to  “Save the Harbor” is to “Share the Harbor” with the public through free events and programs on the Harbor, the beach, the waterfront and the islands.”

Save the Harbor's free Share the Harbor Cruises are made possible with Leadership Grants from Cronin Development, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and Bay State Cruise Company.

Save the Harbor is grateful for Leadership Grants from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, The Boston Foundation, The Coca-Cola Foundation, Exelon Generation, and John Hancock Financial Services.

Save the Harbor is also grateful for Partnership Grants from the Boston Bruins Foundation, Boston Properties – Atlantic Wharf, Boston Properties—200 Clarendon, The Daily Catch Seaport, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Eastern Salt Company, Inc., Engie, Fan Pier - The Fallon Company, Highland Street Foundation, Hood Business Park, The HYM Investment Group, LLC, IR+M Charitable Fund, The Llewellyn Foundation, Massachusetts Port Authority, National Grid Foundation, P & G Gillette, Lawrence J. and Anne Rubenstein Charitable Foundation, William E. Schrafft & Bertha E. Schrafft Charitable Trust, Clinton H. & Wilma T. Shattuck Charitable Trust, and Vertex.

Save the Harbor also appreciates Stewardship Grants from the Camp Harbor View Foundation, Circle Furniture, Comcast, Copeland Family Foundation, The Cricket Foundation, Cruise Industry Charitable Foundation, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Elizabeth Elser Doolittle Charitable Trust, Dorr Charitable Foundation, Enbridge, Tom & Lucinda Foley, Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation, The Kershaw Foundation – Cheers for Children, George Lewis - Haven Trust, Liberty Bay Credit Union, Lovett Woodsum Foundation, Maine Community Foundation, MarineMax Russo, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Nicholson Foundation, Pabis Foundation, REI, RMR Real Estate Services, Rockland Trust Pavilion, Skanska, Abbot & Dorothy H. Stevens Foundation, TD Charitable Foundation, and Tishman Speyer.
Save the Harbor would also like to thank our Program Funders Andus Baker & Rowan Murphy Family Fund, MA Attorney General’s Office Healthy Summer and Youths Jobs Program, The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation, Beacon Capital Partners, LLC, Andrew Calamare & Marianne Connolly, Cell Signaling Technology, Diversified Automotive, Legal Sea Foods, Miss Wallace M. Leonard Foundation, Mass Bay Credit Union, Matthew J. & Gilda F. Strazzula Foundation, UDR, and Kyle & Sara Warwick.

Save the Harbor would also like to extend our gratitude to our Supporters 3A Marine Service, The Bay State Federal Savings Charitable Foundation, Cresset Group, Massachusetts Marine Educational Trust, Randy Peeler & Kate Kellogg.

Special thanks as well to the hundreds of individual donors for their support and to our partners at the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Metropolitan Beaches Commission, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and the YMCA of Greater Boston.

To stay up-to-date on the work we do to restore, protect and share Boston Harbor visit www.savetheharbor.org and like or follow savetheharbor on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Saturday, September 7, 2019

Brown Algae Bloom


 There have been a number of recent reports of an algae bloom in Boston Harbor and elsewhere around the region which has stained the water a chocolate brown.



Staff from the MWRA, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, and the MA Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) have collected and analyzed samples of the bloom and determined that the culprit is a naturally occurring algae, Karenia mikimotoi, and that similar blooms have recently been reported elsewhere in the Gulf of Maine.

The culprit: Karenia Mikimotoi, is a naturally occurring nuisance algae.

 Though the drop in dissolved oxygen levels caused by the bloom can affect fish and shellfish, DMF reports that Karenia  mikimotoi  is NOT a public health concern, and that the water is safe for boating, fishing and swimming.

"Algae blooms like this one are fairly common" said Save the Harbor/Save the Bay's Director of Strategy and Communications Bruce Berman, who has been working closely with the MWRA to monitor the situation. "This one has lasted longer and is more extensive than most we have seen in the region in recent years. "

"Though it doesn't pose a threat to human health like the recent blue green algae bloom in the Charles River, we are concerned that blooms like this may become more common as a result of warmer water caused by climate change" said Berman. "We are glad that the MWRA and state agencies are working together with Save the Harbor/Save the Bay and other stakeholders to understand and address the situation."

The MWRA is keeping a close watch on the bloom and dissolved oxygen levels in the harbor, and will be conducting additional surveys after the storm.

For more information please contact Bruce Berman at berman@savetheharbor.org, or on his cell at 617-293-6243.




Thursday, August 22, 2019

bird whisperer

While at BCM I  have had a lot of interactions with kids coming back multiple times to bonding with my co workers while eating lunch. We have even had interactions with a bird. These interactions are one of the many things that make my day while working at BCM. It's also like a special treat when the regulars show up since BCM is sometimes a ghost town. One of the best parts at BCM is teaching a kid to fish and see them get so happy. You help  guide them and really get invested sometimes,  even to the point where the time fly's by and next thing you know its lunch break or time to pack up.  Those moments are great and it brings life to the rest of the day for me. Whats even better is when the kid you've been helping and been fishing with them, catches there first fish, or crab. You know you've done a good job when the kids face explodes with glee. Now it is great and all when you have these types of interactions but none of them have been my best interactions. My best interaction was with a  bird we named Keko. Keko was a seagull that would swim around in the harbor and we would feed our left over squid bate too.
Eventually Keko stuck around and we started feeding him and making sure our pal was alright. Sadly Keko was attacked by a fellow Seagull and his wing was broken. We would see Keko try to  swim around while his wing was broken. We fed him and made sure he was happy but his wing never got better. One day I was going to get some water from the LL Bean dock since it was low tide and needed some for the touch tank. When I opened the gate, Keko was there.  His wing was still broken and he didn't look to good. At that point we had BCM call animal control to see if they could help him but they never showed up. We took care of  Keko until we had to leave. We gave him a lot of squid and played around with him. Sadly it was Friday and when we returned on Tuesday Keko wasn't there. I'd like to think that Keko's wing did heal and he flew away and was happy but that's unrealistic. Everytime we see a Seagull that looks like Keko, We name that  bird Keko with a random Number. Maybe one of those Keko's is the real Keko but who knows.
Either way
I'm sailing off
-Anthony M

work memories

Successful Fishing Days 
Having fun on self enrichment days and events 
Soaring to be a good example for staff and participants 
Bonding with coworkers and children 


Fishing Derby 2019
The beginning of a great summer began when I was offered the Senior Harbor Educator position at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay. On the first day of orientation I already had a premonition it was going to be an experience I would  never forget. The staff was outgoing, encouraging and welcoming to all the new members of the organization. Starting the day off at Spectacle Island put a great preview of what our days working would possibly look like. 

I was programmed at Boston Children's Museum, which I was thrilled for! I enjoy working with the pediatric population so I couldn't wait to begin teaching children about fishing. I met a lot of connections that I may find useful in my future endeavors. 

I also signed up to work the Revere Sand Castle event, where I saw Andres sand rake some beautiful art! If you have not visited the Revere Sand Castle event, you must put that on your bucket list! The sandcastles are breath taking! 

I really enjoyed creating these blogs every week, because it allows me to remember all the exciting adventures that took place with my amazing co workers and participants. To cap off a great summer working for Save the Harbor I would have to explain how much I enjoyed the fishing and boat trips we took as a team! 

On our first staff enrichment day, we got to kayak the Boston Harbor and clean the waters, collecting about ten bags of trash. That was great because I bonded with people who I don't usually see at my site. Our other staff day, we took a ride to Lovells island on the Belle. Man, do I love that belle boat, I will most definitely miss that in the winter time! At Lovells island we got to swim and hike with a partner or two, it was a relaxing Monday afternoon making memories with the summer staff. 


The highlight of the summer was the Fishing Derby, as a group we got divided into boats and had to catch the most fish and the largest fish to win the prize. Even though I didn't win the price it was a great time on a beautiful boat with kind mates showing us how to catch big stripers! We caught two stripers and twenty mackerel (bait fish)! 



Its been a fishing good summer! 

Crab ya later,

Kat

H2O facts

The Boston Harbor waters have come along way since 1950.
Studying the water quality is exceptionally important, there are four categories of water contaminants, those being physical, chemical, biological and radiological. If you kitchen faucet or shower head is contaminated with bacteria or viruses, you may be more prone to getting sick. 
My house in the suburbs of Chicago had a problem with lead back in the 1990's, it was due to the pipes being rotted but the problem was resolved and our waters have been safe to drink since then. 

The most common tests for water are coliform bacteria, E.coli, arsenic, hardness, lead/copper and etc. In the last decade the interest in home drinking water treatment products have expanded. Many chose to add a filtration system or drink out of water bottles. 

The most challenging issue with maintaining high water quality is the presence of chlorine based disinfectants that are added to the water supply to kill bacteria. Unfortunately, the water testing agencies have minimum knowledge of the side effects of disinfection byproducts in our water. On the bright side, Boston drinking water has tested low levels of disinfection chemicals. 
 
A grandma that brought her grandchildren to fish at Boston Children's Museum was explaining to us back in the 50's she would see ice skates, milk gallons, and the most random items in the Charles River. She really liked our mission of keeping the waters clean and going out on staff enrichment days to make an organization presence in the city. 

Crabs ya later, 
Kat

P.S. Fishing derby, what a striping fun time! 

Not the Crab, you want in your Krabby Patty!

Well we’re diving right back in to another blog. It’s Anthony and this week was my first week at the Boston Children’s Museum. A couple of exciting events happened this week from catching huge crabs and enormous fish to teaching kids how to fish like a professionals. Yet only learned about a week ago. Most of the week was very slow and not much was caught but it was still exciting meeting brand new kids! On Tuesday, the day started off normally  with slow activity from the crabs and people, it seemed it was gonna be like yesterday. Luckily that wasn’t the case,  out of no where a line we had pulled to our surprise. The rod started to bend and something tugged the line. When it got to the surface I couldn’t believe what I saw, a crab! Huge and hooked on the the rod. In comparison, this crab made the others look extremely tiny! This guy was at least 10 green crabs side by side. Right before it got above the water however, it let go and sank back to the bottom. This giant crab would be back. It turned out that the crab was a spider crab. Fully grown and scary looking, but that didn’t stop us from trying to get him again. Over and over again we all hooked the beast, but time and time again the beast evaded us. Even a net was brought out, to get him. But each time we tried, we failed.

 Fast forward through the day, it’s right after lunch. A man with his son come by to fish. By now the Harbor is at low tide or at least close to it. I thought the chances of catching the spider crab were slim, Too small and maybe if  the chances were small we would all give up. However when the man reeled the rod in, the rod bent a little and there was a little resistance. I had thought that maybe a small crab was on the line, but boy was I wrong. Right down there the beast rose up. I grabbed the net and was ready to catch. He would not get away this time, the hook was in the spider crabs mouth. He brought it up to where I could get it with the net and boom. The beast was caught, we finally got the beast. It was huge and scary. Like it’s name, it looked very much like a spider, but it was a crab. This was the catch of the week in my opinion and that’s saying something since we caught a big striper the same day. The reason the spider crab beats the striper in the catch of the week for me is how hard we all fought to catch the spider crab. Constantly hooking it but not catching it made it so when we did catch it, it had more meaning than the striper. Anyways, I’ll catch you later. It’s been reel.
-Anthony M