Wednesday, May 8, 2019

MBC To Hold Public Hearing In Winthrop On May 14

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) will hold the final community hearing, the seventh of nine public hearings in the winter and spring of 2019, for waterfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket to receive public input about the state of the beaches. The hearing for Winthrop will be held on Tuesday, May 14th from 6-8pm at the Arthur T. Cummings School.

“The region’s public beaches are important recreational, economic, and educational assets,” said State Senator Brendan Crighton, Senate Co-Chair of the MBC. “Working together we have made our beaches cleaner, safer and more accessible, and I am looking forward to continuing our work together this year.”

“Winthrop Beach is one of Winthrop’s most valuable assets,” said Senator Joseph Boncore, who serves on the Metropolitan Beaches Commission. “The MBC works tirelessly to protect our natural resources to ensure they are accessible for generations to come.”

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission was created in 2006 by the Massachusetts Legislature to make findings and recommendations on ways to strengthen the Boston metropolitan region's 15 public beaches in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull which are managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The Commission is comprised of elected officials and community, civic, nonprofit, and business leaders from Boston and the metropolitan region's waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities.

In 2013, the Commission reconvened to examine the impacts of the reforms and recommendations made in its first report and issue additional findings and recommendations to better leverage these resources for residents in the future. The MBC was made permanent in 2015. Each year the Commission holds public hearings at the State House and in waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket, and issues an annual report of its findings and recommendations to the Legislature and to DCR.

“As the Commissioner from Revere Beach, the nation’s first public beach, I know how important these resources are,” said State Representative RoseLee Vincent, House Co-Chair of the MBC. “Beaches like Revere Beach are premier destinations for millions of visitors from across the Commonwealth and the country, and enhance the lives of the community members who live along their shores.”

The Commission will release its third report on the state of the metropolitan beaches in late spring after the hearings are completed. During the last round of hearings more than a thousand people participated, helping the Commission understand what’s working and what could use improvement.

“One of the most important lessons we have learned is that the region’s residents really love their beaches, and have great ideas about how to make them better,” said Bruce Berman, Director of Strategy and Communications at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which has helped to lead and manage the Commission since its inception. “We look forward to hearing from the residents of Winthrop and all who love Winthrop Beach.”

Each hearing will give community members and beach goers the chance to share their thoughts on the state of their beach, and share their ideas and recommendations to make them even better. The Commission will hold a hearing in late May to review its draft findings with the public before releasing their final report in June. The Commission has held hearings in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Hull, and finally Winthrop between February and May 2019. The MBC held a hearing in Quincy in August of 2018, and the feedback received will also be included in the Commission’s report.

If you love your beach, but can't attend the MBC Hearing, you can share your thoughts by taking part in the MBC online survey at https://tinyurl.com/BeachesSurvey.

Monday, April 29, 2019

Beaches Commission Hearing in South Boston

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) will hold nine public hearings in the winter and spring of 2019 in waterfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket to receive public input about the state of the Commonwealth’s public beaches. The hearing for DCR’s Carson Beach in South Boston will be on Monday May 6th from 6-8pm at the Tynan Community Center. 




South Boston’s legislative and local Commissioners Representative David Biele and Kenny Ryan invite the public to attend and share their thoughts and ideas for DCR’s Carson Beach.

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission was created in 2006 by the Massachusetts Legislature to make findings and recommendations on ways to strengthen the Boston metropolitan region's 15 public beaches in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull which are managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The Commission is comprised of elected officials and community, civic, nonprofit, and business leaders from Boston and the metropolitan region's waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities.

In 2013, the Commission reconvened to examine the impacts of the reforms and recommendations made in its first report and issue additional findings and recommendations to better leverage these resources for residents in the future. The MBC was made permanent in 2015. Each year the Commission holds public hearings at the State House and in waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket, and issues an annual report of its findings and recommendations to the Legislature and to DCR.

The Commission will release its third report on the state of the metropolitan beaches in late spring after the hearings are completed. During the last round of hearings more than a thousand people participated, helping the Commission understand what’s working and what could use improvement.

“One of the most important lessons we have learned is that the region’s residents really love their beaches, and have great ideas about how to make them better,” said Bruce Berman, Director of Strategy and Communications at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which has helped to lead and manage the Commission since its inception. “We look forward to hearing from the residents of South Boston and all those who love DCR’s Carson Beach.”

Each hearing will give community members and beach goers the chance to share their thoughts on the state of their beach, and share their ideas and recommendations to make them even better. The Commission will hold a hearing in late May to review its draft findings with the public before releasing their final report in June. The Commission will hold hearings in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, and Hull between February and May 2019. The MBC held a hearing in Quincy in August of 2018, and the feedback received will also be included in the Commission’s report.

If you love your beach, but can't attend the MBC Hearing, you can share your thoughts by taking part in the MBC online survey at tinyurl.com/BeachesSurvey, available also in Chinese (tinyurl.com/BeachesSurveyChinese) and Spanish (tinyurl.com/BeachesSurveyEspanol)

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Metropolitan Beaches Commission to Hold Public Hearing in Revere April 30

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) will hold a public hearing on the state of Revere Beach on Tuesday, April 30, at the Jack Satter House from 6 - 8 p.m. This is one of nine public hearings in the winter and spring of 2019 in waterfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket to receive public input about the state of the beaches.


“The region’s public beaches are important recreational, economic, and educational assets,” said State Senator Brendan Crighton, Senate Co-Chair of the MBC. “Working together we have made our beaches cleaner, safer and more accessible, and I am looking forward to continuing our work together this year.”

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission was created in 2006 by the Massachusetts Legislature to make findings and recommendations on ways to strengthen the Boston metropolitan region's 15 public beaches in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull which are managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The Commission is comprised of elected officials and community, civic, nonprofit, and business leaders from Boston and the metropolitan region's waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities.

“Revere Beach is one of Revere’s most valuable assets,” said Sen. Joseph Boncore, who serves on the Metropolitan Beaches Commission. “The MBC works tirelessly to protect our natural re­sources to ensure they are accessible for generations to come.”

In 2013, the Commission reconvened to examine the impacts of the reforms and recommendations made in its first report and issue additional findings and recommendations to better leverage these resources for residents in the future. The MBC was made permanent in 2015. Each year the Commission holds public hearings at the State House and in waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket, and issues an annual report of its findings and recommendations to the Legislature and to DCR.

“As the Commissioner from Revere Beach, the nation’s first public beach, I know how important these resources are,” said State Representative RoseLee Vincent, House Co-Chair of the MBC. “Beaches like Revere Beach are premier destinations for millions of visitors from across the Commonwealth and the country, and enhance the lives of the community members who live along their shores.”

The Commission will release its third report on the state of the metropolitan beaches in late spring after the hearings are completed. During the last round of hearings more than a thousand people participated, helping the Commission understand what’s working and what could use improvement.

“One of the most important lessons we have learned is that the region’s residents really love their beaches, and have great ideas about how to make them better,” said Bruce Berman, Director of Strategy and Communications at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which has helped to lead and manage the Commission since its inception. “We look forward to hearing from the residents of Hull and all those who love Revere Beach.”

Each hearing will give community members and beach goers the chance to share their thoughts on the state of their beach, and share their ideas and recommendations to make them even better. The Commission will hold a hearing in late May to review its draft findings with the public before releasing their final report in June. The Commission will hold hearings in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, and Hull between February and May 2019. The MBC held a hearing in Quincy in August of 2018, and the feedback received will also be included in the Commission’s report.

The 2019 Metropolitan Beaches Commission hearings will be held on the following dates:

·         Tuesday March 5th  – Hull
·         Tuesday March 19th – Lynn and Nahant
·         Saturday March 30th – Dorchester

·         Tuesday April 9th – East Boston
·         Tuesday April 30th – Revere
·         Saturday May 4th – South Boston
·         Tuesday May 14th – Winthrop
·         Saturday May 18th – Regional Review
·         Tuesday June 4th – Report Release at State House

If you love your beach, but can't attend the MBC Hearing, you can share your thoughts by taking part in the MBC online survey at tinyurl.com/BeachesSurvey

Getting Back Outside on the Waterfront for April Vacation Programming

Why wait for the summer to get outside and fish? This April vacation week brought with it the first opportunity for outdoor programming with Save the Harbor/Save the Bay’s Boston Harbor Explorers program. Hosted by Atlantic Wharf and Boston Properties, 210 kids from youth groups around Boston enjoyed a morning of history, art, and science of the Boston Harbor.

Each morning kicked off with a welcome and storytelling with Tony the Pirate as he told tales of the golden age of piracy in the harbor. Kids learned tips and tricks on how to tell an engaging story, and soon were sharing their experiences with their peers.

At the next station, participants created environmental art by painting water bottles to resemble fish as a part of our Changing Course program created by Save the Harbor artist in residence Robyn Reed. Fish are displayed in public places in “schools”, and the multitude of them is impressive as each one represents a student learning about how to prevent more plastic in our oceans.

At the touch tank, groups had a chance to meet Frank the six pound lobster and his friends the two large rock crabs. They were fascinated to learn about their behaviors, diet, role in the aquatic ecosystem, exoskeletons and how to determine if the animal is male or female.

The following station had each group gather to sing the official Save the Harbor sea chantey, “Haul Away Together”, as a reminder that when we all work together we can accomplish huge feats, whether it be raising the sails on a ship, or keeping the Boston Harbor clean.
Fishing was the biggest draw of the day, as by the end of the day the kids were baiting, casting, and reeling like pros.

The day wouldn’t be complete without a lunch of Boloco burritos, courtesy of Atlantic Wharf.
Save the Harbor would like to thank our amazing partners at Atlantic Wharf and Boston Properties for hosting our April Break Programming, James Hook & Co. for lending us our crustacean friends, and of course the groups from the East Boston YMCA, Wang YMCA, Dorchester YMCA, The Community Group, Greater Boston YMCA, and Castle Square Tenants Association for coming out to participate in these fun filled days.


For more information on our Youth Programs and other similar events, visit savetheharbor.org and check out our blog – blog.savetheharbor.org

Monday, April 22, 2019

Earth Day Clean Up with National Grid

On Earth Day 2019 Save the Harbor/Save the Bay staff teamed up with National Grid for a clean-up at the Department of Conservation and Recreation's Malibu/Savin Hill Beach in Dorchester.


Malibu/Savin Hill is a swimming beach along the Dorchester Bay Basin near UMass Boston. This popular neighborhood beach includes great walking paths, green space, and a playground.

On Monday the group of 12 employees from NGRID helped to make this property cleaner and more accessible by removing two tons of debris, weeds, and wash up over the course of the day. Volunteers scoured the sand, green areas, and parking lot to pick up debris, and raked storm wash up from the beach. Another team removed phragmites, an invasive sea grass, from the sidewalk and boardwalk.




“It was a very productive day on the beach, thanks to our partners at National Gird,” said Tani Marinovich, President of Save the Harbor/Save the Bay. “In just a few hours we removed two tons of waste, something that might take a week of regular staff time during the spring season, freeing up DCR staff to take on other projects on beaches and parks around the area.”

This day of service was part of Save the Harbor's stewardship program, a collaboration with DCR and our corporate partners to help preserve, maintain, and improve the region's spectacular waterfront resources, and National Grid's #GridGoesGreen Earth Day initiative. Save the Harbor is proud to work with our partners as we prepare these beaches for everyone to enjoy this spring and of course the coming summer season.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Marine Mammal Safaris Kicked Off a Beautiful Weekend in Boston

With a light sprinkle in the morning air and the promise of afternoon sun, 850 people from across the region joined Save the Harbor/Save the Bay on Saturday’s three Marine Mammal Safaris as a part of the Share the Harbor program. The overwhelming response and turnout topped any of the previous 15 trips, not to mention the copious amount of seals and porpoises spotted on each cruise.


Aboard Massachusetts Bay Lines’ boat Freedom, families, neighborhood groups, and individuals from Boston’s communities and beyond were eager to see what the clean water of the Boston Harbor had in store for them. As the rain subsided, the guests of the first and second cruises were able to see three seals out by the Fish Pier, and even caught a glimpse of the fin of a porpoise gliding sneakily by the Charlestown Navy Yard.

The last cruise of the day embarked onto the harbor with 75 degree sunny weather – a great turnaround from the projected overcast skies. Although the charismatic macrofauna were a bit more hesitant to appear for the passengers, as we motored over to East Boston, a plethora of seals and even a few porpoises made an appearance.


In the moments where there were no sightings of aquatic mammals, Save the Harbor staff donned their pirate hats and sang the sea chanty Haul Away Together to remind those around them that if they work together, just as the pirates did as they hoisted the sails, they can accomplish big things.

Those aboard were thrilled to be on the harbor for the first set of Share the Harbor cruises of 2019. In continuing our mission of sharing the harbor for the public to enjoy, Save the Harbor is hosting 7 more free cruises to Spectacle Island and Boston Light throughout the summer and fall months. Check out the remaining Share the Harbor cruise dates on our blog, which includes registration links.



Save the Harbor/Save the Bay would like to thank Massachusetts Bay Lines for their generosity in hosting us aboard Freedom and making it possible to venture out onto the harbor for each safari, while also giving guests great information about their surroundings through historical narration.

For more info on Save the Harbor check out our blog, or follow us on Facebook or Twitter to stay up to date on future events! See you all out on the harbor!

Save the Harbor's free Share the Harbor Cruises are made possible with Leadership Grants from the Cronin Group, LLC, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs Bay State Cruise Company, and Massachusetts Bay Lines

Save the Harbor is also grateful for Leadership Grants from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, The Boston Foundation, The Coca-Cola Foundation, and Yawkey Foundation

Save the Harbor is grateful for Partnership Grants from Boston Properties – Atlantic Wharf, The Daily Catch Seaport, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Eastern Salt Company, Inc., Engie, Fan Pier - The Fallon Company, John Hancock Financial Services, The HYM Investment Group, LLC, The Llewellyn Foundation, Massachusetts Environmental Trust, Massachusetts Port Authority, Mass Humanities, National Grid Foundation, P & G Gillette, Lawrence J. and Anne Rubenstein Charitable Foundation, William E. Schrafft & Bertha E. Schrafft Charitable Trust, and Vertex.

Save the Harbor also appreciates Stewardship Grants from Anonymous, Forrest Berkeley &, Marcie Tyre Berkley, Camp Harbor View Foundation, Circle Furniture , Comcast, Copeland Family Foundation, The Cricket Foundation, Cruise Industry Charitable Foundation, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Elizabeth Elser Doolittle Charitable Trust, Enbridge, Tom & Lucinda Foley, Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation, Kershaw, Liberty Bay Credit Union, Lovett Woodsum Foundation, Maine Community Foundation, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Nicholson Foundation, RMR Real Estate Services, Rockland Trust Pavilion, Clinton H. & Wilma T. Shattuck Charitable Trust, Skanska, and Tishman Speyer

Save the Harbor would also like to thank our Program Funders Andus Baker & Rowan Murphy Family Fund, MA Attorney General’s Office Healthy Summer and Youths Jobs Program, The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation, Beacon Capital Partners, LLC, Cell Signaling Technology, East Boston Savings Bank, Highland Street Foundation/West End House, Legal Sea Foods, Miss Wallace M. Leonard Foundation, George Lewis - Haven Trust, Pabis Foundation, South Boston Community Development Foundation, Abbot & Dorothy H. Stevens Foundation, and TD Charitable Foundation.

Save the Harbor would also like to extend our gratitude to our Supporters 3A Marine Service, The Bay State Federal Savings Charitable Foundation, Andrew Calamare & Marianne Connolly, Cresset Group, Diversified Automotive, Goulston & Storrs PC, Mass Bay Credit Union, Massachusetts Marine Educational Trust, Randy Peeler & Kate Kellogg, Matthew J. & Gilda F. Strazzula Foundation, UDR, and Kyle & Sara Warwick


Special thanks as well to the hundreds of individual donors for their generosity and to our partners at the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Metropolitan Beaches Commission, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and the YMCA of Greater Boston for their support. 


Monday, April 8, 2019

Ten Free Share the Harbor Cruises in 2019

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is continuing to Share the Harbor with the public in 2019 with free events, excursions and programs that connect kids and families to the harbor, the beaches, and the islands that we have worked so hard to restore and protect.

Building upon the success of the inaugural year of our Share the Harbor cruises, we are bringing the program back for a second year with 10 free harbor cruises throughout the spring, summer and fall!


Marine Mammal Safaris:
(leaving from Rowes Wharf with Massachusetts Bay Lines)
Saturday April 13th @ 9:30, 11:30, 1:30

Boston Lighthouse Sunset Cruises:
(leaving from World Trade Center dock with Bay State Cruise Company)

Spectacle Island Trips:
(leaving from World Trade Center dock with Bay State Cruise Company)
October date TBD

The program for these cruises is based on environmental education and songs and stories of the sea that we developed with a team of historians, authors, storytellers and song leaders in order to share the diverse maritime history of Boston and America. The schedule includes trips to Spectacle Island and Boston Light. This spring, summer and fall, both youth and adults will have the chance to connect to the sea by learning about its history as well as the opportunities and challenges we face at present and our role in addressing them.

All smiles on a cruise to Boston Light

Save the Harbor has always believed that part of our mission to save the harbor is to share the harbor with the region's youth and families. This spectacular urban natural resources belongs to all of the region’s residents, but for a variety of reasons not everyone has felt that connection to the water. That is why Save the Harbor first created its Haul Away Together curriculum, to demonstrate the teamwork needed to make a difference.


Songs and stories of the sea by Save the Harbor pirates.
Sign up links for the Boston Light and Spectacle Island cruises will be posted here in the coming weeks. Check back here for sign up information, or follow Save the Harbor on Facebook and Twitter.


Save the Harbor's free Share the Harbor Cruises are made possible with Leadership Grants from the Cronin Group, LLC, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, MADEP, and Bay State Cruise Company.

Save the Harbor is also grateful for Leadership Grants from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, The Boston Foundation, The Coca-Cola Foundation, and Yawkey Foundation

Save the Harbor is grateful for Partnership Grants from Boston Properties – Atlantic Wharf, Mass Bay Lines, The Daily Catch Seaport, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Eastern Salt Company, Inc., Engie, Fan Pier - The Fallon Company, John Hancock Financial Services, The HYM Investment Group, LLC, The Llewellyn Foundation, Massachusetts Environmental Trust, Massachusetts Port Authority, Mass Humanities, National Grid Foundation, P & G Gillette, Lawrence J. and Anne Rubenstein Charitable Foundation, William E. Schrafft & Bertha E. Schrafft Charitable Trust, and Vertex.

Save the Harbor also appreciates Stewardship Grants from Anonymous, Forrest Berkeley &, Marcie Tyre Berkley, Camp Harbor View Foundation, Circle Furniture , Comcast, Copeland Family Foundation, The Cricket Foundation, Cruise Industry Charitable Foundation, Davis Family Charitable Foundation, Elizabeth Elser Doolittle Charitable Trust, Enbridge, Tom & Lucinda Foley, Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation, Kershaw, Liberty Bay Credit Union, Lovett Woodsum Foundation, Maine Community Foundation, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, Nicholson Foundation, RMR Real Estate Services, Rockland Trust Pavilion, Clinton H. & Wilma T. Shattuck Charitable Trust, Skanska, and Tishman Speyer

Save the Harbor would also like to thank our Program Funders Andus Baker & Rowan Murphy Family Fund, MA Attorney General’s Office Healthy Summer and Youths Jobs Program, The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation, Beacon Capital Partners, LLC, Cell Signaling Technology, East Boston Savings Bank, Highland Street Foundation/West End House, Legal Sea Foods, Miss Wallace M. Leonard Foundation, George Lewis - Haven Trust, Pabis Foundation, South Boston Community Development Foundation, Abbot & Dorothy H. Stevens Foundation, and TD Charitable Foundation.

Save the Harbor would also like to extend our gratitude to our Supporters 3A Marine Service, The Bay State Federal Savings Charitable Foundation, Andrew Calamare & Marianne Connolly, Cresset Group, Diversified Automotive, Goulston & Storrs PC, Mass Bay Credit Union, Massachusetts Marine Educational Trust, Randy Peeler & Kate Kellogg, Matthew J. & Gilda F. Strazzula Foundation, UDR, and Kyle & Sara Warwick

Special thanks as well to the hundreds of individual donors for their generosity and to our partners at the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Metropolitan Beaches Commission, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and the YMCA of Greater Boston for their support.

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Beaches Commission Hearing in East Boston April 9th

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) will hold nine public hearings in the winter and spring of 2019 in waterfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket to receive public input about the state of the beaches. The hearing for East Boston will be held on Tuesday, April 9th from 6-8pm at the Orient Heights Yacht Club. 



“The region’s public beaches are important recreational, economic, and educational assets,” said State Senator Brendan Crighton, Senate Co-Chair of the MBC. “Working together we have made our beaches cleaner, safer and more accessible, and I am looking forward to continuing our work together this year.”

“Constitution Beach is one of East Boston’s most valuable assets,” said Senator Joseph Boncore, who serves on the Metropolitan Beaches Commission. “The MBC works tirelessly to protect our natural resources to ensure they are accessible for generations to come.”

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission was created in 2006 by the Massachusetts Legislature to make findings and recommendations on ways to strengthen the Boston metropolitan region's 15 public beaches in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull which are managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The Commission is comprised of elected officials and community, civic, nonprofit, and business leaders from Boston and the metropolitan region's waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities.

In 2013, the Commission reconvened to examine the impacts of the reforms and recommendations made in its first report and issue additional findings and recommendations to better leverage these resources for residents in the future. The MBC was made permanent in 2015. Each year the Commission holds public hearings at the State House and in waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket, and issues an annual report of its findings and recommendations to the Legislature and to DCR.

“As the Commissioner from Revere Beach, the nation’s first public beach, I know how important these resources are,” said State Representative RoseLee Vincent, House Co-Chair of the MBC. “Beaches like Revere Beach are premier destinations for millions of visitors from across the Commonwealth and the country, and enhance the lives of the community members who live along their shores.”

“Boston Harbor, the waterfront, and Constitution Beach are important to residents across East Boston, “ said Rep. Adrian Madaro of East Boston, who serves on the Metropolitan Beaches Commission. “I look forward to hearing from stakeholders and members of our community on how to make Constitution Beach even better.” 


The Commission will release its third report on the state of the metropolitan beaches in late spring after the hearings are completed. During the last round of hearings more than a thousand people participated, helping the Commission understand what’s working and what could use improvement.

“One of the most important lessons we have learned is that the region’s residents really love their beaches, and have great ideas about how to make them better,” said Bruce Berman, Director of Strategy and Communications at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which has helped to lead and manage the Commission since its inception. “We look forward to hearing from the residents of East Boston and all who love Constitution Beach.”

Each hearing will give community members and beach goers the chance to share their thoughts on the state of their beach, and share their ideas and recommendations to make them even better. The Commission will hold a hearing in late May to review its draft findings with the public before releasing their final report in June. The Commission will hold hearings in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, and Hull between February and May 2019. The MBC held a hearing in Quincy in August of 2018, and the feedback received will also be included in the Commission’s report.

If you love your beach, but can't attend the MBC Hearing, you can share your thoughts by taking part in the MBC online survey at https://tinyurl.com/BeachesSurvey

Save the Harbor Honors "Harbor Heroes" at Destination Boston Harbor 2019

On Thursday, March 28, 500 corporate and civic leaders, elected officials, community partners, and Save the Harbor/Save the Bay supporters gathered at the Seaport Hotel for Destination Boston Harbor, Save the Harbor's annual fundraising gala.

This event celebrated a year of on-the-water programming that connects millions of the region's residents and visitors to Boston Harbor, the Harbor Islands, the region's public beaches, and waterfront communities, and reflected on the investments and improvements in access to clean water for all.

Save the Harbor leadership team with the 2019 Boston Harbor Heroes. Left to Right: Joe Newman (STH Board Chair), Maeve Fittz, Sam Bowman, John Sullivan, Tani Marinovich (STH President), David Spillane, Shelagh Mahoney, Kathy Lafferty, Patty Foley (Save the Harbor), Tom Crohan, Veera Mahadomrongkul, Allen Huang, Bruce Berman (Save the Harbor)

Each year, Save the Harbor recognizes men and women as Boston Harbor Heroes for their commitment to Save the Harbor's mission, the community, and the Harbor. Save the Harbor's Board Chair and National Grid’s Vice President of Government Affairs for Massachusetts, Joseph Newman, along with Save the Harbor's new President, Tani Marinovich, thanked the guests and introduced this year’s heroes:

  • The Honorable Martin J. Walsh, Mayor, City of Boston
  • Tom Crohan, John Hancock Financial Services
  • Kathy Lafferty, South Boston Neighborhood House
  • Allen Huang and Veera Mahadomrongkul, Ohana NE Dragon Boat Team
  • Shelagh Mahoney, Eastern Salt Company, Inc.
  • David Spillane, Goody Clancy, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay Board Member
  • John Sullivan, Boston Water & Sewer Commission
  • Sam Bowman, Maeve Fitz, Kharliyah Ortiz, Save the Harbor’s Youth Environmental Education Program

This year's event was particularly special as it included several tributes to the contributions and hard work of Patty Foley, who has retired after 20 years as President of Save the Harbor/Save the Bay. Mayor Walsh began by reflecting on his work with Foley during his time serving in Massachusetts Legislature as the Representative from Dorchester. He credited her with educating him about the challenges faced by the neighborhood beaches and being a tireless advocate for the investing resources for their improvement. Mayor Walsh also reflected on the threat posed by climate change and the need to work collaboratively with organizations such as Save the Harbor to ensure resiliency for future generations.

Left to Right: Tani Marinovich President of Save the Harbor, Bruce Berman of Save the Harbor, Mayor Martin J. Walsh, Patricia A. Foley of Save the Harbor, Briana Curren of Wells Fargo, and Joe Newman of National Grid, Save the Harbor Board Chair

A video tribute included remarks from Paul Grogan of the Boston Foundation, Charlayne Murrell-Smith of the Boston Children’s Foundation, Bill Delahunt of The Delahunt Group, Ronda McCloud of JetBlue, Harold Sparrow of the Greater Hartford YMCA, Robert Travaglini of Travaglini, Eisenberg, and Kiley, Joe Newman, Tani Marinovich, and Bruce Berman of Save the Harbor and Foley's husband.

Finally, former Massachusetts Senate President Robert Travaglini and former State Senator Jack Hart reflected on their work with Foley through the Metropolitan Beaches Commission which was first created in 2006 to report on the challenges and needs of the region's state-owned beaches. Travaglini, Hart, and Susan Tracy of The Strategy Group and Save the Harbor's Board of Directors then asked attendees to consider a gift to the Patty Foley Legacy Fund.

Marinovich thanked everyone for their support, for making 2019 the most successful Destination Boston Harbor ever with more than $750,000 raised for continued advocacy for, and programming on, Boston Harbor, the harbor islands and the regions beaches.

Save the Harbor would like to thank all of our sponsors, silent auction donors, and supporters including presenting sponsor Wells Fargo for the support of the important work we to restore and preserve Boston Harbor for future generations.



Saturday, March 30, 2019

MBC Hears from Beach Lovers in Dorchester

Nearly 30 people gathered at the Savin Hill Yacht Club on Saturday morning to discuss the current state of the public beaches in Dorchester -- Savin Hill, Malibu, and Tenean -- and to express their likes, dislikes and visions for these beaches. It was the fourth in a series of nine public hearings being hosted by the Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) in the region’s beachfront communities as part of the process to write a report with findings and recommendations for the Commonwealth.



Commission Co-Chair Representative RoseLee Vincent of Revere opened the hearing by welcoming folks and encouraging them to engage deeply. Co-Chair Representative Vincent told everyone that while she is very proud to represent Revere, she was “really here today to listen to all of you and find out what the big issues are here in Dorchester.” Local Commissioner Paul Nutting of the Friends of Savin Hill Shores thanked his fellow commissioners for coming to learn about Dorchester.

Leo Stella, Policy Director for Senator Nick Collins and Dorchester resident, welcomed those in attendance and thanked everyone for joining in the conversation.

To kick off discussion Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which leads and manages the Commission for the Commonwealth, presented information on the history and mission of the Metropolitan Beaches Commission and current issues of concern. Save the Harbor’s Director of Strategy and Communications Bruce Berman discussed previous findings and recommendations, on-going discussions of marine mammal disposal and parking management, and provided an update on the progress that has been made to identify the causes of water quality concerns at Tenean Beach and make plans for improvement.

Attendees then split into breakout groups for a chance to voice their opinions. People were encouraged to make notes on ‘what’s working well,’ ‘what needs improvement’ and ‘what’s missing.’

What beach lovers and resident appreciate most is the work the DCR puts in to keep the beaches in Dorchester looking nice, including sand raking at Savin Hill and maintaining the playground at Tenean Beach. Several folks also noted how much they enjoy the boardwalk at Savin Hill as a resource for daily walks, runs, and seasonal events.

In terms of improvements, participants would like to see new fencing, more trash barrels with lids, a plan to deal with the invasive species phragmites, and more trash pick up in the parking lot at Savin Hill Beach. In addition, there are still serious concerns about the water quality issues facing Tenean Beach and a strong desire to see a resolution to the problems there.

Finally, groups identified a need for toilets at Savin Hill beach, toilets open year round, and the completion of the Neponset Greenway at Tenean Beach so that the path runs from Milton to Castle Island in South Boston.

After the breakout sessions each group reported to the crowd the highlights of their discussion. The Commission closed by thanking everyone for their input and inviting them to a regional review hearing on May 18th from 10am-12pm at UMass Boston where the MBC will present their findings and recommendations for Dorchester’s public beaches and ask attendees to give feedback before the report is finalized.

If you have questions, or would like to provide your input but were unable to attend the hearing, the Commission accepts comment via email at mbc@savetheharbor.org or through the online survey found at tinyurl.com/BeachesSurvey. The survey is also available in Spanish and Chinese.

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Our Funders and Supporters

Thank You to All of Our Destination Boston Harbor Funders & Supporters for Helping Make Destination Boston Harbor 2019 Possible


$30,000 - $50,000+
Bay State Cruise Company
Exelon Generation
JetBlue

$25,000
Goody Clancy
Engie
HYM Investment Group, LLC
Massachusetts Port Authorty 
National Grid
Wells Fargo

$15,000 - $20,000
Cronin Group, LLC
Eastern Salt Company , Inc.
Fan Pier- The Fallon Company
Harpoon Brewery
Massachusetts Bay Lines
Seaport Hotel & World Trade Center

$7,500 - $14,999
Catalyst New Media Group
Circle Furniture 
Kershaw Foundation - Cheers for Children
Nutter
Rockland Trust Pavilion/Live Nation

$5,000 - $7,499
Anonymous
Boston Sword & Tuna
Charter Contracting Company
Comcast 
Con Edison Clean Energy Businesses
Cottonwood Management 
E.M.Duggan
Enbridge
GZA GeoEnvironmental Inc. 
Hilco Global & Redgate Capital Partners
Invesco
J. & M. Brown Company, Inc.
Keegan Werlin, LLP
Lee Kennedy Co, Inc.
Massachusetts Water Resources Authority
Massachusetts Convention Center Authority
Millennium Boston
New Boston Ventures
Skanska
Senior Housing Properties Trust & The RMR Group
Vertex

$3,500 - $4,999
Anbaric 
Anderson & Kreiger LLP
The Barking Crab
Boston Consulting Group
Boston Planning  & Development Agency 
Boston Properties - Atlantic Wharf
Boston Yacht Charters 
CBT Architects
Coca-Cola of Northern New England
Cushman & Wakefield
Dark Horse Capital Partners
Elkus Manfredi Architects
Epsilon Associates
Equinor
Greenberg Traurig LLC
Harbinger Development & 
Intercontinental Real Estate Corporation
ICON Architecture Inc. 
International Place & Harbor Garage
Jamestown
JLL
MarineMax Russo
Orsted Wind Power North America LLC
Related Beal LLC
Rockland Trust
TRC
Turner Construction
Vineyard Wind LLC

$1,000 - $3,499
Mary-Jo Adams & John Sasso
Alliant Insurance Services
Arrowstreet, Inc. 
Atlantic Coast Seafood, Inc.
Audi of America
Boston Boat Works LLC
Boston Freight Terminals
Boston Private
Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum
Brown Rudnick LLC
Cambria Hotel Downtown Boston
C&W Services
Charles D. Sheehy, Inc.
Mark & Michelle Chrisos
CIBC Private Wealth Management
CJR- Strategic Transition Partners
Conventures, Inc.
Copley-Wolff Design Group Inc. 
Conroy Development 
Cresset Development
Cushing & Dolan, P.C. 
Drew Company
Durand & Anastas
Eversource
Jay & Karen Fernandes
Haley & Aldrich
Hines
Howard Stein Hudson
Joyce & Joyce
JW Capital Partners & SKW Partners, Inc.
Kearney, Donovan, & McGee, P.C.
Charles Kouyoumjian & Tani Marinovich
Lendlease
Legal Sea Foods
Mass Electric Construction Co.
Martha Mazzone Charitable Gift Fund
McDermott Ventures, LLC
Milone & MacBroom
Murphy Donoghue Partners
New England Finish Systems
Ocean Havens, Inc.
ROCK Development 
Smith, Costello & Crawford
Stantec Architecture
Stavis Seafoods
Sullivan & McLaughlin Companies
Sunrun
TetraTech
The Strategy Group, Inc.
Tito’s Handmade Vodka
Travaglini, Eisenberg, & Kiley LLC
Utile, Inc.
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc
Vacovec, Mayotte, and Singer, LLP. 
Wellesley Bank
WinnCompanies
YMCA of Greater Boston  
       
$500 - $999
Brian Burke 
Citrin Cooperman
Greater Boston Convention & Vistiors Bureau
Kyocera New England
MJR Consultants 
ML Strategies
Raine Associates, Inc.

Our Special Thanks to Presenting Sponsor Wells Fargo & The Patty Foley Legacy Fund Donors

$30,000
Gregory Bialecki & Mary Herlihy

$25,000
Thomas & Patricia O’Brien
John Hancock
Wells Fargo

$10,000
Anonymous 
Arbella Foundation
Lee Kennedy Co., Inc.  
Lewis Family Foundation 
William E. Schrafft & 
Bertha E. Schrafft Charitable Trust

$5,000
Anonymous
Andus Baker & Rowan Murphy Family Fund
Happy Green 
International Place & Harbor Garage
Johnson O’Connor Feron & Carucci LLP
George Lewis
Lovett Woodsum Foundation
Joseph & Patricia Newman 
Susan Tracy
Kyle & Sara Warwick 

 $1,500 -2,500
The Barking Crab
Laura Burke 
Christopher Byner
Coca-Cola of Northern New England
Mark and Michelle Chrisos
Constitution Marina
ICON Architecture Inc
Kiewit 
Martha Laposata 
Nick Martin
Richard & Colleen McKenna 
Judith & Thoru  Pederson
David Spillane 
Travaglini, Eisenberg, & Kiley LLC

$500 - $1,000
Mary-Jo Adams & John Sasso 
Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Boston
Circle Furniture 
William F. Coyne Jr. 
Bill Delahunt & Julie Pagano
Mary Doyle
Michael Dunn
Durand & Anastas
William & Susan Elsbree
Stephen Faber
Episode Foundation
Foundations for Boston Centers
Chuck Gordon
Christopher Greeley
William & Susan Hadge
Jack Hart
Joanne Jaxtimer
Joe Larkin 
Martha Mazzone Chartitable Gift Fund
Elizabeth Nicholson
Jeannette Orsino
Christian & Melissa Scorzoni
Marie Turley
Betsy Van Dorn

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Metropolitan Beaches Commission to Hold Public Hearing in Dorchester March 30

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) will hold nine public hearings in the winter and spring of 2019 in waterfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket to receive public input about the state of the beaches. The hearing for Dorchester will be held on Saturday, March 30 at the Savin Hill Yacht Club from 10am-12pm. 




“The region’s public beaches are important recreational, economic, and educational assets,” said State Senator Brendan Crighton, Senate Co-Chair of the MBC. “Working together we have made our beaches cleaner, safer and more accessible, and I am looking forward to continuing our work together this year.”

The Metropolitan Beaches Commission was created in 2006 by the Massachusetts Legislature to make findings and recommendations on ways to strengthen the Boston metropolitan region's 15 public beaches in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull which are managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). The Commission is comprised of elected officials and community, civic, nonprofit, and business leaders from Boston and the metropolitan region's waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities.

In 2013, the Commission reconvened to examine the impacts of the reforms and recommendations made in its first report and issue additional findings and recommendations to better leverage these resources for residents in the future. The MBC was made permanent in 2015. Each year the Commission holds public hearings at the State House and in waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket, and issues an annual report of its findings and recommendations to the Legislature and to DCR.

“As the Commissioner from Revere Beach, the nation’s first public beach, I know how important these resources are,” said State Representative RoseLee Vincent, House Co-Chair of the MBC. “Beaches like Revere Beach are premier destinations for millions of visitors from across the Commonwealth and the country, and enhance the lives of the community members who live along their shores.”

The Commission will release its third report on the state of the metropolitan beaches in late spring after the hearings are completed. During the last round of hearings more than a thousand people participated, helping the Commission understand what’s working and what could use improvement.

“One of the most important lessons we have learned is that the region’s residents really love their beaches, and have great ideas about how to make them better,” said Bruce Berman, Director of Strategy and Communications at Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which has helped to lead and manage the Commission since its inception. “We look forward to hearing from the residents of Dorchester and all those who love Dorchester's beaches.”

Each hearing will give community members and beach goers the chance to share their thoughts on the state of their beach, and share their ideas and recommendations to make them even better. The Commission will hold a hearing in late May to review its draft findings with the public before releasing their final report in June. The Commission will hold hearings in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, and Hull between February and May 2019. The MBC held a hearing in Quincy in August of 2018, and the feedback received will also be included in the Commission’s report.

The 2019 Metropolitan Beaches Commission hearings schedule is:

  • Tuesday March 5th – Hull
  • Tuesday March 19th – Lynn and Nahant
  • Saturday March 30th – Dorchester
  • Tuesday April 9th – East Boston
  • Tuesday April 30th – Revere
  • Monday May 6th – South Boston
  • Tuesday May 14th – Winthrop
  • Saturday May 18th – Regional Review
  • Tuesday June 4th – Report Release at State House

If you love your beach, but can't attend the MBC Hearing, you can share your thoughts by taking part in the MBC online survey at tinyurl.com/BeachesSurveyEncuesta de las playas públicas disponible en Español. 公共海滩调查问卷;中文版可用

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

MBC Hears from Beach Lovers Regarding the State of Lynn and Nahant’s Public Beaches

Nearly 50 people gathered at the North Shore Community College on Tuesday night to discuss the current state of the public beaches in Lynn and Nahant and to express their likes, dislikes and visions for these beaches. It was the third in a series of nine public hearings being hosted by the Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) in the region’s beachfront communities as part of the process to write a report with findings and recommendations for the Commonwealth.


Commission Co-Chairs Senator Brendan Crighton of Lynn and Representative RoseLee Vincent of Revere opened the hearing by welcoming folks and encouraging them to engage deeply. Co-Chair Crighton noted that he has been involved with the Commission since he began working as a staffer for then Senator and Chair of the Commission Tom McGee, who also attended the hearing. Crighton said that “since then all of your recommendations have been put into these reports and not just ended up on some shelf collecting dust but have influenced how we approach our budget, along with our legislative priorities including the environmental bond bill.” He noted how “great it is to see these beaches crowded each summer”, but acknowledged that there are still improvements that can be made. He closed by encouraging people to share their thoughts in the breakout sessions stating that “the most valuable part of this hearing tonight is the breakouts where we can hear from you and you can go into things in more detail.”



Co-Chair Representative Vincent told everyone that while she is very proud to represent Revere, she was “really here tonight to listen to all of you and find out what is important to the people in the City of Lynn and Town of Nahant.”

Local Commissioners Representative Donald Wong, Nahant Town Administrator Antonio Barletta, and Robert Tucker of the Friends of Lynn and Nahant Beach also attended and participated in group discussions during the breakout sessions.



Beach lovers from Lynn, Nahant, Swampscott, and Marblehead attended the hearing where Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which leads and manages the Commission for the Commonwealth, presented information on the current state of the public beaches. Save the Harbor’s Director of Strategy and Communications Bruce Berman provided an update on the progress that has been made to improve water quality conditions at Kings Beach which faces persistent challenges.

Attendees then split into smaller discussion groups for a chance to voice their opinions. People were encouraged to make notes on ‘what’s working well,’ ‘what needs improvement’ and ‘what’s missing.’

Participants mostly agreed that what is working well includes timely trash pickup, the concerts and summer activities, and the landscaping along the beaches. Some groups discussed the improvement in rare birds in the area and the steps that have been taken to protect their habitats. Attendees also praised the Department of Conservation and Recreation’s dedicated work to remove pilayella algae at Kings Beach, while expressing a desire to find a more permanent solution.




The small discussion groups seemed to come up with similar notes in the ‘what needs improvement’ category including summer traffic and parking as well as the need to have toilets available all year-round. Many also raised concerns over the water quality challenges related to the Stacey’s Brook outfall and expressed a need for increased signage regarding when to avoid swimming near that spot in the short term. Better protection of dunes was also mentioned, along with the need to invest in improvements to stairwells and handrails.

The ‘what’s missing’ category brought about the widest array of discussion topics. Some highlighted pedestrian safety and suggested adding more crosswalks and repainting the existing ones, as well as the need to better enforce the speed limits. Groups discussed the need for more educational signage and programs for people of all ages, the desire for more concessions and vendors along the beach, and a range of creative ideas for new programming and events on the beaches.




After the breakout sessions each group reported to the crowd the highlights of their discussion. The Commission closed by thanking everyone for their input and inviting them to a regional review hearing on May 18th from 10am-12pm at UMass Boston where the MBC will present their findings and recommendations for Lynn and Nahant’s public beaches and ask attendees to give feedback before the report is finalized.

If you have questions, or would like to provide your input but were unable to attend the hearing, the Commission accepts comment via email at mbc@savetheharbor.org or through the online survey found at tinyurl.com/BeachesSurvey. The survey is also available in Spanish and Chinese.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

Splashing in the Snow to Support Public Beaches

On March 10, 2019, nearly 200 beach lovers braved not only the chilly winter waters but also snowy weather and plunged into Boston Harbor at the BCYF Curley Community Center in South Boston as part of the 9th annual Harpoon Shamrock Splash to benefit Save the Harbor/Save the Bay and the Department of Conservation and Recreation's Better Beaches Program.


  On Sunday, nearly 200 costumed splashers plunged into the cold waters of Boston Harbor. Photo by Matt Phillips.

This year, the “pledge and plunge” fundraiser raised more than $50,000 for the Better Beaches Program, which provides grants to community organizations that host free events and programs on the region's public beaches. Each year the program supports free concerts and beach festivals, sand-sculpting competitions, and youth programs on public beaches in Lynn, Nahant, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy and Hull. You can find the exact tally on the event website at www.shamrocksplash.org.

“Thirty years ago nobody wanted to go swimming at the region's beaches and today, they are some of the cleanest urban beaches in the country,” said Save the Harbor President Tani Marinovich. “It’s amazing to see the community that supports this event and supports our beaches from Nahant to Nantasket.”

Splashers line up on the beach ready to take the plunge at the 2018 Harpoon Shamrock Splash. Photo by Katy Rogers.

Before the sprint into the ocean, Boston 25 Meteorologist Vicki Graf was on hand to deliver a real-time weather report -- although the air temperature was 34 degrees, the water itself was a balmy 40 degrees!

Even though everyone was already wet from the snow and rain before splashing into the Harbor, 2019’s Harpoon Shamrock Splash was the best one yet, with splashers enjoying delicious brunch burritos from Baja Taco Truck and fresh, hot chowder from Daily Catch while Mix 104.1 played hit music on the beach. Harpoon beers invigorated participants after their plunge.

"I love when it snows on Splash day," said Bruce Berman, Director of Strategy and Communications for Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, who has splashed every year since the event began. "We're hearty here in New England and the only thing we love more than snow is the beach."


(Left to right) Kennedy Elsey of Mix 104.1, Donnie Todd of JetBlue, Joe Skahan (dressed as Beaker), Elaine Howley (dressed as a Banana Minion), Nick Russo (dresses as Aladdin), Jane Kepros (dresses as a goldfish), and Charlie Storey of Harpoon. Skahan and Howley took first place at the Harpoon Shamrock Splash’s costume contest. Both contestants won a round trip JetBlue flight. Russo and Kepros won second place and received items from the Harvey Traveler Collection. Photo by Matt Phillips. 

“All of us at Harpoon look forward to taking a quick dip into the icy water after our Harpoon St. Patrick’s festival to support a great cause and warm up with a refreshing Harpoon, brunch burrito, and clam chowder on the beach with our friends from Save the Harbor/Save the Bay,” said Harpoon Brewery President Charlie Storey. “Sure it was cold in the water, but the warm feeling you get from giving back to your community stays with you for a long time.”


(Left to Right): Vicki Graf of Boston 25, Chris Mancini of Save the Harbor, Tani Marinovich of Save the Harbor, Donnie Todd of JetBlue, Bruce Berman of Save the Harbor, Michelle Palermino of Harpoon, Jessie Cox of Harpoon, and Charlie Storey of Harpoon. Photo by Katy Rogers.

Participants won JetBlue flights and great Harpoon swag for reaching fundraising goals. Mary Cole from East Boston, who raised $1,530 and had the most donations to her splash -- who followed through on her promise to her donors to dye her hair green if she met her goal! -- and Trevor Etheridge from Jamaica Plain, who raised $1,655 were the top two fundraisers. They each won round trip JetBlue flights for their efforts.

Left to right: Kennedy Elsey of Mix 104.1, Donnie Todd of JetBlue, Joe Skahan of Lynn dressed as Beaker from the Muppets, Elaine Howley of Waltham dressed as the Banana Minion, Nick Russo of South Boston dressed as Aladdin, Jane Kepros of East Boston dressed as a goldfish, and Charlie Storey of Harpoon.

The two costume contest winners, Elaine Howley of Waltham, dressed as the Banana Minion, and Joe Skahan from Lynn, dressed as Beaker from the Mupets, won JetBlue flights as well for their creativity and enthusiasm. Second place costumed splashers were Jane Kepros of East Boston, as a Goldfish and Nick Russo of South Boston, as Aladdin. They won swag from The Harvey Traveler Collection. Special thanks to Kennedy Elsey of Mix 104.1 for once again serving as contest judge! Every splasher and contributor also had the opportunity to win prizes in two post-splash JetBlue flight raffles.


Martha Laposata of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Trevor Etheridge of Save the Harbor, and Carlos Fuentes of the East Boston YMCA strike a pose before splashing. Etheridge raised $1,655 and was one of the top two fundraisers at the 2019 Harpoon Shamrock Splash. Photo by Matt Phillips.

Photo by Katy Rogers. 

"At JetBlue, we are committed to our community and fun is one of our core values,” said Donnie Todd, Corporate Responsibility Liaison for JetBlue, who led a team of 30 participants. "More than 3,500 JetBlue crewmembers call Boston home, we cherish our harbor and proudly support Save the Harbor/Save the Bay and the work they do on the region's public beaches."

Members of Save the Harbor/Save the Bay’s leadership team were also key fundraisers, but were ineligible to win JetBlue flights. Save the Harbor/Save the Bay’s Chair of the Board, Joe Newman from Arlington, raised $3,401. Bruce Berman, Director of Strategy and Communications from Brighton, raised $3,115. Save the Harbor’s Vice President of Programs and Operations, Chris Mancini from Somerville, raised $2,577.

The top five teams also raised significant funds at this year’s Harpoon Shamrock Splash. Save the Harbor/Save the Bay topped the list with $13,373, followed by JetBlue with $10,990 and the Piers Park Sub-Aqua Warriors with $4,950. Team YES raised $3,162 and Team Harpoon! raised $2,720.


Bridget Ryan of South Boston and Kristen Barry of Cambridge return with their Harpoon beers after splashing. Photo by Katy Rogers.


Participants could direct their fundraising to their favorite local beach. South Boston led with $6,547 followed by Constitution with $5,845 and Winthrop was third with $4,985. Participants raised $4,561 for Lynn & Nahant, $1,815 for Revere Beach, $1,540 for Wollaston. In addition, Dorchester beaches received $1,290 and Nantasket Beach received $1,060.

“Save the Harbor would like to thank event sponsors at Harpoon Brewery, JetBlue, Mix 104.1, Baja Taco, The Daily Catch, The Harvey Traveler Collection, Unreal Candy, Stony Brook WholeHeartedFoods, and the Blue Sky Collaborative,” said Marinovich. “as well as our Better Beaches Program Funding Partners at The Boston Foundation, Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation, P&G Gillette, National Grid, Comcast, Beacon Capital Partners, and New England Picture.”

We would also like to thank the Massachusetts Legislature, the Baker-Polito Administration and the Metropolitan Beaches Commission for their support for our beaches, and our program partners at the Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and the Greater Boston YMCA for their support.

About Save the Harbor/Save the Bay 
As the region's leading voice for clean water and continued public investment in Boston Harbor, the region's public beaches, and the Boston Harbor Islands, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay's mission is to restore and protect Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay and the marine environment and share them with the public for everyone to enjoy.

For more information about Save the Harbor/Save the Bay and the work they do, please visit their website at www.savehtheharbor.org, their blog "Sea, Sand & Sky" at blog.savetheharbor.org, or follow savetheharbor on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

You can download a copy of the most recent Better Beaches program report at http://savetheharbor.org/Content/2018_Beaches_Report.pdf